Recipes

Recipe: Vanilla frosting

Recipe: Vanilla frosting Author: Style At Home

Recipes

Recipe: Vanilla frosting

Let's just dive in, shall we? Not only does this recipe produce a thick and creamy vanilla frosting, it also doubles as a whipped topping, and left unrefrigerated it becomes a vanilla sauce to serve with crumbs, shortcakes, or volcanoes. And why stop there? I especially love the sauce on savoury bites like the corn bread, muffins, and biscuits, where it acts like a decadent sweet butter. If you try to steer clear of soy, replace the liquid and powdered soy with the rice milk variety for both in equal measure—but be advised that the result will taste slightly sweeter. Please note: If it's true frosting you want, be sure to factor in the full 6 hours for it to chill and set.

INGREDIENTS
1½ cups unsweetened soy milk
3/4 cup dry soy milk powder
1 tablespoon coconut flour
1/4 cup agave nectar
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1½ cups coconut oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

PREPARATION
In a blender or a food processor, combine the soy milk, soy powder, coconut flour, agave nectar, and vanilla. Blend the ingredients for 2 minutes. With the machine running, slowly add the oil and lemon juice, alternating between the two until both are fully incorporated. Pour the mixture into an airtight container and refrigerate for 6 hours or for up to 1 month. (If you plan to use it as a sauce, store the mixture at room temperature for up to 1 week.)

Makes enough to frost 24 cupcakes

 


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BUY THIS BOOK
Excerpted from BabyCakes: Vegan, Gluten-Free, and (Mostly) Sugar-Free Recipes from New York's Most Talked-About Bakery by Erin Mckenna. Copyright 2009 by Clarkson Potter. Excerpted with permission by Clarkson Potter. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Just because you support fair-trade coffee, drive a hybrid car, and drink wheatgrass every day doesn't mean your cupcakes have to be drab, dull, and devoid of colour. Here are a few natural ways to get vibrant colours that will have everyone wondering where you’re stashing your Easter egg dye. Because Mother Nature works in mysterious ways, colour your frosting no more than a few hours before applying it, as the colours tend to change over time. And because each juice is concentrated differently, be sure to add coloring little by little until you reach the desired hue.

Pink/Red: Cherry, raspberry, cranberry, pomegranate, and beet juice all give gorgeous colour.

Purple: Blueberry juice delivers a regal purple—the more you use, the deeper the hue.

Green: Chlorophyll is the green pigment found in most plants. You can find it in liquid form at your local health-food store.

Yellow: Turmeric is a plant in the ginger family that is usually dried and ground into a powder. Just a pinch will tint your frosting the yellow of a freshly opened Peep, and it’s completely vegan.

 


babycakes150.jpg BUY THIS BOOK
Excerpted from BabyCakes: Vegan, Gluten-Free, and (Mostly) Sugar-Free Recipes from New York's Most Talked-About Bakery by Erin Mckenna. Copyright 2009 by Clarkson Potter. Excerpted with permission by Clarkson Potter. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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Recipes

Recipe: Vanilla frosting