Hotel Style

Hotel style: Park Hyatt, Shanghai

Style at Home
Hotel Style

Hotel style: Park Hyatt, Shanghai

When it opened in September 2008, the Park Hyatt Shanghai officially became the highest hotel in the world. The elevator ride up to the lobby is long and full of anticipation. But as the elevator doors finally ease open to reveal the stunning 87th-floor lobby, the view does not disappoint. The dark mahogany wood of the reception area against pale coffee-coloured walls is rich and luxurious. The exceptionally high ceilings (unexpected in a high-rise building) give instant grandeur to the space and create an immediate sense of extravagant style.

Designed by New York–based Chinese-American interior designer Tony Chi, the rooms at the Park Hyatt Shanghai are nothing short of sophisticated. With high-tech features (remote controlled shades that, at the click of button, reveal a sweeping view of Shanghai, a television screen hidden in the bathroom mirror and a toilet that does everything but your laundry) and an otherwise minimalist decor, the rooms are a perfect mixture of modern American design and traditional Chinese Zen.

We checked in with Caitlin Hickey, a public relations representative for the hotel, to find out more about the inspiration behind the hotel’s beautiful design.

styleathome.com: How would you describe the look of the hotel bedrooms?
Caitlin Hickey:
The monochromatic rooms, with walls lined in linen, lacquer finish and slatted wood panels, feature daybeds for in-room massage treatments, walk-in dressing rooms with front and back mirrors, DVD players, broadband Internet access, flat-screen plasma TVs, and espresso machines. The spacious stone-walled bathrooms have an additional plasma TV embedded in the vanity mirror, along with marble freestanding double sinks, Oriental bathing areas with an oversized monsoon rain showers, an overflowing soaking tub, separate toilets for guest privacy, and Acca Kappa toiletries.

sah.com: What was the design inspiration for these rooms?
CH:
Tony Chi’s vision was to create a sophisticated modern-Chinese residence, designed with respect to traditional Chinese geometry and architecture, providing all the comforts of a stately home. Following this philosophy, guests travel through a sequence of gates, halls, and chambers, culminating in a courtyard where daily life congregates. Chi envisioned these courtyards as calm and spiritual sanctuaries where guests can practice tai chi or play Chinese chess. These spaces are therefore understated in both mood and design, with a predominance of earth tones and natural materials.

sah.com: What makes these rooms special?
CH:
Every room features views of the Huangpu River and Pudong, and the standard rooms, measuring 55 to 60 square meters (592 to 646 square feet), are the largest in the city. Coupled with the generous 3.1-meter (10-foot) ceiling height, the rooms feel particularly spacious.

sah.com: What is the overall feeling of the room and how was this achieved?
CH:
I think that the overall feeling is one of serenity, achieved by the simple clean lines in the design and the high ceilings and spacious bathroom. There really is also a residential feel to the rooms that comes through in the small touches such as in-room check-in, the mailbox slot outside the room where the paper is delivered each morning, and the velvet lined tray as a place to keep your jewelry.

Special thanks to the Park Hyatt Shanghai and to Jet Airways.
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Hotel Style

Hotel style: Park Hyatt, Shanghai