Hotel Style
Aug 16, 2011

Hotel style: Viceroy Anguilla Resort

By: Jasmine Miller

Hotel style: Viceroy Anguilla Resort Author: Style At Home

Hotel Style
Aug 16, 2011

Hotel style: Viceroy Anguilla Resort

By: Jasmine Miller
VICEROY-outside.jpg

Jetsetters know the Caribbean is full of hidden gems and one of the brightest is the Viceroy Anguilla Resort. About 16 miles long, the tiny island of Anguilla is known for its laidback-luxe vibe, nearly constant sun and azure-blue beaches. The Viceroy capitalizes on these charms with its stunning oceanfront location and low-key design. The 166 rooms, suites, penthouses and villas boast a decorating style any castaway could fall for (the entire space is a Kelly Wearstler design, so we expected nothing less). Picture expansive, open-air spaces, whitewashed plaster and plenty of colonial-inspired wood. The quiet and refined space is the perfect backdrop for the ocean, flowers and sky, which provide the minimalist buildings and grounds their only real pops of colour.

Jutting between two of the island’s best and deeply secluded beaches (Barnes and Meads Bays), the Viceroy is a low-lying architectural showstopper. Clean lines of stone and concrete juxtaposed against a winding, grass-covered rock face set the stage for what’s inside. From the lobby to the bars and spa, each area is a happy marriage of contradictory textures and materials. Here, driftwood meets finely honed stone; aged metals watch over glass and rattan; pillow-soft upholstery turns hard-edged sofa frames cosy and welcoming. Sparse without feeling cold, all the villa interiors let the natural environment take centre stage. VICEROY-living-room.jpg

Sky-high ceilings and wall-to-wall windows embrace the sea-to-sky view from the living room. Open the patio doors, and Mother Nature waltzes in. By extending the same floor tile from the living room through the patio, the designer blurs the boundary between indoors and out, especially with the doors flung wide. Try this in your own home: many stone and porcelain (not ceramic) tiles stand up to indoor/outdoor use, and a calming, sand-toned palette offers a cool take on island-luxe. Replicate the look by pairing neutral walls with tonal upholstery (natural linen, hemp, cotton), mid-toned wood and stone. The secret is to emphasize textures rather than colour for effortless chic. VICEROY-dining.jpg

Villa dining rooms at the Viceroy prove that monochromatic doesn’t have to be monotonous. The secret is in the layering of the textures, starting with the substantial table at the heart of the space. Heavy, in weight and in aesthetic, the stone piece is lightened by virtue of the smooth, sun-reflecting material and a hit of glitz at the base. Art plays a central role here, and all over the 35-acre resort. Small sculptures and statues rest behind large doors in the common areas, and perch on poolside tables, too. In the rooms, abstract paintings inspire the guests’ own creative thoughts and work to anchor the room. 

If you want to bring touches of this design idea back home, feel free to break form and rules, as the designer has here: a golden metal base works with the stainless chair frames. And don’t shy away altogether from kitsch or whimsy—the chandelier here, a grouping of man-made “shells,” is a subtle nod to the location, a quiet reminder of paradise. VICEROY-bedroom.jpg

Not just a place to park your luggage, the villa bedrooms are designed to be living space, too. The floor-to-ceiling shutters let you stay cool, but still sun-drenched. Rattan chairs are welcoming reading nooks, and comfortable enough for an afternoon nap, but the bed is the undeniable focal point. The fabric headboard ties into a substantial poster, and the final indulgence? Sferra bedding—smooth, crisp and custom-designed for the resort. VICEROY-bath.jpg

In an en suite, a single choice for tile floor, walls and tub surround creates a visually restful scene. (A nearly indistinguishable grout colour is key to making the effect work.) Made from a single piece of wood, the chair has no right angles, only soft edges that look like they were carved by nothing more than the wind and sand. Add the fact that the rain shower is outside, and a distinct indoor or outdoor experience disappears. The flat island is cooled by trade winds and blessed with clear skies for most of the year, but you don’t need good weather to enjoy this space. Glass doors mean any of the short, infrequent rains that hit the island can be enjoyed from the comfort of the sunken tub.
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Hotel Style

Hotel style: Viceroy Anguilla Resort